Passenger air-safety: Top 10 Airline Safety Tips

 



Top 10 Airline Safety Tips
Due to the events of 11 September 2001, there have been a variety of changes in the air travel in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world. In addition to advice on this page, AirSafe.com also provides other information related to the current air travel situation:

Fly on Nonstop Routings

Most accidents occur during the takeoff, climb, descent, and landing phase of flight so flying nonstop would reduce exposure to these most accident prone phases of flight.

Choose Larger Aircraft
Currently, aircraft with more than 30 passenger seats were all designed and certified under the strictest regulations. Also, in the unlikely event of a serious accident, larger aircraft provide a better opportunity for passenger survival.

Pay Attention to the Preflight Briefing
Although the information seems repetitious, the locations of the closest emergency exits may be different depending on the aircraft that you fly on and seat you are in.

Keep the Overhead Storage Bin Free of Heavy Articles
Overhead storage bins may not be able to hold very heavy objects during turbulence, so if you or another passenger have trouble lifting an article into the bin, have it stored elsewhere.

Keep Your Seat Belt Fastened While You are Seated
Keeping the belt on when you are seated provides that extra protection you might need if the plane hits unexpected turbulence.

Listen to the Flight Attendants
The primary reason flight attendants are on an aircraft is for safety, so if one of them asks you to do something like fasten your seat belts, do it first and ask questions later.

Don’t Bring Any Hazardous Material
There are rather long lists of hazardous materials that are not allowed, but common sense should tell you that you shouldn’t bring gasoline, corrosives, poisonous gases, and other such items on the aircraft unless they were allowed by the airline and shipped in a proper container.

Let the Flight Attendant Pour Your Hot Drinks
Flight attendants are trained to handle hot drinks like coffee or tea in a crowded aisle on a moving aircraft, so allow them to pour the drink and hand it too you.

Don’t Drink Too Much
The atmosphere in an airliner cabin is pressurized to about the same altitude as Denver, so any alcohol you consume will affect you more strongly than at sea level. Moderation is a good policy at any altitude.

Keep Your Wits About You
In the unlikely event that you are involved in an emergency situation such as a precautionary emergency evacuation, follow the directions of the flight attendants and flight crew and exit the aircraft as quickly as possible.

(this article was reproduced from http://www.airsafe.com/ten_tips.htm website)